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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
they notice the underground economy, and the guy is worth like a billion dollars. he's a big reason for a lot of the cocaine, heroin and marijuana in america. >> wields a lot of power. >> i wonder what else he does. >> heroin, cocaine, marijuana. multiple industries. it's proof to me, i think, that the war on drugs has xleecomple failed if an illegal drug trafficker is in the top 60. he's been on the list since 2009, so they've known about him. it's ridiculous this soort of person would be on the list, but then it calls into question the nature of power. yes, he has this power in terms of the drug economy, but he can't just go anywhere. he's in control of the space he's in, unless there's bodyguards around him. when he goes to restaurants he locks the door and takes the cell phones and pays for everybody's meal. if you can't control the space that you move through, how are you actually powerful? it calls into nature what power is. >> that's why he's not 52. >> he's the number one most wanted fugitive in the world. >> he's seen a lot. maybe that makes him powerful on the wanted posters. let's
. if the economy tanks because we have a dysfunctional government that can't accomplish what is a simple deal here, everybody is going to suffer. so both sides want a deal. they've staked out positions that really aren't that far apart. obama will concede on something public at some point, and i think you see some concessions from republicans and we'll see when that happens. maybe it will happen. the idea we're at a fiscal cliff where the economy stops on january 1st is completely misleading. it's a squeeze. everyone will feel it, but then you're in a position where everyone can vote to cut taxes. that might be more politically feasible. >> i like that perspective. you help us take out some of the fear mongering we see, a lot of the media is perpetuating. that's why we're doing the fiscal follies and the wheel of fortune. fiscal fiesta. the media is doing all this fear mongering and you get a lot out of washington. this is a self-created drama, of course. these cliff negotiations. but the markets are remaining relatively calm and steady. why are investors being so cool and above the fray when ever
to survive in this economy and how to be successful in this economy. the first thing we'll want to do with any income that i have is tax it? that's uncertainty. >> kristen welker is at the white house. critics said the president wasn't pushing a bald deal focusing more on taxes than spending. now the white house is out with its formal debt proposal which mitch mcconnell says he laughed at when tim geithner showed to him. what's so funny? >> reporter: to put the plan into context, first of all, this is the president's opening bid. and essentially comes after he's feeling emboldened by his re-election knowing there's not a whole lot in here that republicans will like off the bat. so just to take a look he it specifics, $1.6 trillion in new taxes, $400 billion in entitlement cuts. $50 billion in new stimulus. and then a proposal to end congress' control of the debt limit. republicans on the hill are essentially calling this plan a nonstarter. house speaker john boehner saying this is not serious. cantor echoing those remarks. they say they want to see fewer taxes and deeper cuts to entit
to oppose and will not agree in order to protect small businesses and our economy. instead new revenue would be generated through pro-growth tax reforms that closes special interest loopholes and deductions while lowering rates. you see in this latest proposal while they offer up pour savings by saying, look, we can tax the rich people through the $800 billion figure. we can find more savings in entitlements reforms and more savings in discretionary spending more so than the budget control act. they're still holding firm on that pledge not to raise the tax rates towards the bill clinton era. how will this play around in the white house? we don't know. this tax rate point has been a very difficult sticking point. both sides have stayed on and they continue to stay on this in their second offer. what you see is some sort of possible framework for a large scale deal. the $2.2 trillion number, republicans are the first to tell you is bigger than $1.6 trillion the democrats outlined last week. they believe from discussions that have occurred over the last few years in regards to the debt limit an
. the american economy is on the line. and this is a moment for adult leadership. >> to talk all things politics, we bring in nick from the "new york times." politico is reporting today boehner and the president had a curt phone call. that's curt with a "c." should we be reading something into that? >> you almost can't tell what's happening by looking at the president and jay carney and speaker boehner are saying. you have to look further out and see where the ripples are. really when boehner's talking and when the president is talking, they are talking to their members in congress. so it's members you have to look at. obviously, there are teams of economists and policy experts behind the scenes that are crafting all kinds of compromises. it really comes down to the members, i think. >> let's talk about one of those members, representative tom cole, republican from oklahoma came out and said he thinks republicans should go ahead and pass what the president has proposed, basically extend the tax cuts for the middle class up to $250,000. then deal with that other piece. speaker boehner came out an
. it has enormous economies of scale and bargain for better rates of doctors and hospitals dictate prices so for what it provides, medicare's very cheap. it's getting expensive over time because a lot more people are going on to the program and in general the health care system, public health insurance, private health insurance, it's all very expensive and only so much right now that medicare can do about it. the problem isn't medicare, per se. not that medicare is a wasteful program but the health care system is -- and health care costs and getting in to the guts of the health care system and rather than lopping off a sum of health care. >> if we lowered health care costs overall, the cost of medicare goes down andรง medica more affordable without necessarily even needing to tinker with medicare and the point of something that you were writing about. we have all the conversations about hundreds of billions and cutting from medicare to deal with the fiscal cliff right now but your point is, if we can get the cost of health care under control we don't need to cut anything right now and th
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)